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Transition Planning

If your child has a statement of special educational needs, you will have been invited each year to a review meeting at school to talk about their progress.

What are transition planning reviews/meetings?

The review in Year 9 is called the Transition Review. There may be a number of  professionals, such as teachers, transition social workers and educational psychologists at the meeting, as well as a Careers Wales Adviser, who will work with you to help plan for your child's future.

This review meeting should be centred on your child’s wishes, views and hopes for their future. You and your child will be asked for your views and a Transition Plan will be drawn up by the school. This will identify on-going school provision and appropriate post-school provision. Your involvement in the meeting will be very important so it is useful to prepare for the meeting and think about what you want to say and what you want to ask.

Every Review after Year 9 looks at the Transition Plan. The Careers Adviser will work with you from Year 9 onwards to help you and your child with their transition from school.

What can I do to prepare for transition planning meetings?

Talk to your son or daughter about how things are going in school and about their ideas for the future. Think about questions you may want to ask. Here are some topics to help you get started:

School

 

  • What qualifications will my child have when they leave school?
  • Can they stay on after Year 11?
  • How is the school preparing young people for when they leave?
  • Will there be any work experience opportunities before they leave school?
  • What support is my child having in school?
Future options
  • I don’t know enough about options for the future. How can I find out more?
  • My child has support in school. What happens when they leave and go onto college?
  • What sort of courses does the local college offer?
  • What is Jobs Growth Wales+/Training?
  • How do you get an apprenticeship, and can young people get additional support on these?
  • How many days a week is college/Jobs Growth Wales+/social services provision?
  • My child wants to get a job but needs help. What support is out there for this?
  • How long can a young person stay in college or training?
  • What happens to any benefits they get when they move on from school?
  • What practical support will we get to make sure that the move from school is successful?
Social Service provision
  • What sort of activities could my child do with social services?
  • How many days a week could they access?
  • What age groups would they be with?
  • What happens if my child has medical issues that need to be supported during the day?    
  • How do I find out more about supported or independent living?
  • Are there any benefits or grants available?
  • My son or daughter has a social worker now. Will they still have a social worker when they are 18?
  • Will our social worker change when my child reaches 18?
  • My child doesn’t have a social worker, but I feel that we need one. What can we do?
Health provision
  • How will my child access health support when they are 18?
  • My child has therapies in school, what happens when they leave?
Transport
  • When my child leaves school how will they get to college/work/social services provision?
  • Is there any support for travel to training to help my child learn how to travel independently?
  • If there is support for transport how do I access it?
  • Is there a bus to the college and who pays for it?

If you are still unsure and would like to talk to us, contact us for more help and support.

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Agencies that can support

Find out the many agencies that support young people with Additional Learning Needs (ALN) and their families.